Silvery-Locks and the Three Bears…

Mother Bear

(a.k.a Carreg Samson)

With a total disregard for tradition we tackled our ‘just right bowl of porridge’ first .

It is strange to say, perhaps, but this particular conglomeration of, once covered but now exposed, structured stone did not, initially, feel particularly motherly.

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For one thing there seemed to be a general reluctance for people to step inside.

Was this fear, awe, reverence…?

Perhaps it was a commingling of all three emotions…

The structure does cast an illusion of wanton precariousness.

Those undressed slabs of rock together comprise an impressive sight and tonnage.

The bones of our ancestors were once interred here.

More recently it has served as a sheep shelter.

Whatever it was it was soon dispelled as we got ‘down and dirty’ in the chamber in order to read a contemporary ‘Druid Prayer’.

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There is a theory about male and female standing stones.

The broader, squatter, shorter stones being deemed female whilst the taller, thinner, longer stones are deemed male.

It struck me that if the Cap Stone were upright it would probably be regarded as a male stone.

From this angle though the Cap Stone, in its present state, looks like nothing so much as a bird skull.

Which may cause pause for thought…

Was there a deeper level of symbolism at play than the familiar Womb -Tomb equation?

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There is talk in the official literature of a possible second chamber and certainly from this angle the Cap Stone looks quite badly broken.

It would also explain the curiously lonely looking ‘stone figure’ to the right.

Whichever way one approaches the structure it is hard to shake the resemblance to a modern day coffin with pall bearers…

Except, perhaps, this one…

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The Cap Stone possesses contours which closely resemble a distant Head Land.

This is best seen in image one.

When the structure was covered in earth and grass this resemblance would, presumably, be even more accurate, especially if seen from a distance.

The portal ‘looks out’ across an ocean with an isle in it.

It is from this Isle, legend tells us, St Samson flicked the stones to land and take up their present position.

3 thoughts on “Silvery-Locks and the Three Bears…

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