Bardic Study – The Iron Stone…

hm15-1494*
Another early song from Robin Williamson.
Not too much to interpret, perhaps, in this weeks offering.
Just a straight forward description of the finding of a stone, which we are bound to assume is the account of a true story.
And maybe, the answer to a mystery…
*
A long wind
A weaving mind
Over all the land the wild flowers grow,
Echoing kind to kind.
On that day when I found the iron stone
Heavy in my hand in the sloping rain.
*
Except, as descriptions of a day go that is, perhaps, far, far and away so far from  normal as it is possible to be…
‘Long’ in time? Resulting in the ‘Weaving’ of mind?
The story teller could be fishing.
A ‘long wind’ where wind rhymes with mind would lead to a ‘slow reveal’…
It is extremely difficult not to be persuaded of some form of leave taking or transport here.
Who regards plant growth as an echo?
In a later version of this song ‘sloping rain’ becomes ‘floating rain’ which adds immeasurably to the other worldliness of the occasion.
*
Ever the seas rolled on
And o’er my heart
They roofed their slates of grey,
The iron stone I found it on that day.
*
As is that…
Has the singer collapsed on the beach?
All the seas raise grey slates over the singer’s heart?
In their natural course?
Okay, so maybe the stone itself is having this effect on its finder?
*
The iron stone I brought it home.
Heavy in my hand I brought it home,
Black as the thoughts of doom,
A man told me it came from the moon…
*
The last line, perhaps, indicates that the singer found the stone when still young…
*
Flying through time it flew…
*
Well, if it did come from the moon then it would have had to fly through time, or is it the singer who flies through time?…
*
Upon the long beach where I found it,
Dancing horses told their tale.
*
A poetic description of the sea but by this stage there could very well be talking horses prancing about upon the seashore…
*
Among the stones it called me,
There my hand it knew.
Seeing in the thickness of its thick black sight,
Forests and centaurs and gods of the night,
Never that sun shone on…
*
Ah ha!
It is a scrying stone, or at least it is being used as one.
The transfer of abilities from singer to stone supports the earlier interpretation.
*
Where High Atlantis raised her shores,
How sang the dragons of the sea.
The Stag Hunt rushing round the world,
One turn of light its gone again.
*
The Stag Hunt is spectral.
*
The eyes of Merlin speak beneath their crown of silver grey.
A piece of iron, black and heavy.
Smooth and rounded by the sea,
Holding its sand and stones.
*
It is tempting, perhaps, to regard the last three lines as spoken by Merlin…which may or may not be referring to the stone.
*
To recap…
Boy  notices a smooth rounded dark stone amidst the pebbles on a rainy, windy beach.
He picks it up and is immediately transported to a wild flower strewn place where the rolling seas seem to speak to him and guard his emotions.
He takes the stone home and is told by a man that it comes from the moon.
Later he notices that by gazing into its dark depths he can see visions from an otherworldly realm.
And supposes that he encounters Merlin who speaks to him.
*
 Personally, I think this is a birth-day song, but I could be wrong.
*
 And the mystery it solves?
“He turned up good when he was fourteen, he was handsome and he was good and nobody remembers teaching him anything.”
– Billy Connolly (on Robin Williamson)
*
hm15-1495*

One thought on “Bardic Study – The Iron Stone…

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s