Religious Syncretism? IX…

*

“Do we know who the the author is?”

“Do we ever know who the author is?”

“Do we know who the author is purported to be?”

“Gilgamesh existed as the legendary protagonist in a number of Sumerian poems long before ‘his story’ was turned into an ‘epic poem’.”

“So who turned it into an epic poem?”

“The compiler of the first ‘epic’ now referred to as the Old Babylonian Version is unknown.”

“And the later version?”

“Five hundred years after the Old Babylonian version had been circulated a ‘scholar-priest’ called Sin-leqi-unninni revised and elaborated it.”

“Another name to conjure with.”

“Sin-leqi-unninni’s epic is now regarded as the Standard Version.”

“And in some quarters, at least, he is regarded as a genius with greater psychological acumen than Carl Gustav Jung.”

“Well, he was a priest.”

“A proper priest.”

“Undoubtedly.”

*

 

 

4 thoughts on “Religious Syncretism? IX…

  1. Such incredible depth of knowledge of those who turned this story into a form that would survive through eons. So appropriate for it to survive so long. What is it about some stories that cause people to remember them forever, and to make sure that they stay somehow in print even when others attempt to destroy the works, or the people who are attempting to read and follow the wisdom they offer. Everyone seems to pitch in with whatever skills, materials or just plain labor they can to help preserve what has been sacred to them, even when they are perhaps unable to read themselves. I love the way that people treasure things that preserve what they know about the life and times in they lived, or those times they would have liked to have lived. I can remember what a precious gift it was to sit at my grandma’s feet as she sat in her rocking chair and have her read the old fairy tales to me. She always read me the two same ones – The Red Shoes and The Little Match Girl. I remember everything – every lesson in those stories – and there were some good ones I still remember. Humankind needs the stories. Without them life would be very barren indeed.

    Liked by 1 person

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