Daily Archives: March 8, 2018

Time Lines II…

Image result for Pazuzu

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… “In later Assyrian Mythology, Anzu becomes Pazuzu.”

“Am I missing something, here?”

“Pazuzu is a ‘wind demon’ responsible for bringing plague and pestilence, and whatever else we may think about the notions of a demon, in that region of the world, a wind that brings both pestilence, usually locusts, and plague, does indeed exist.”

“Am I still missing something here?”

“Pazuzu is reputed to be the brother of Humwawa!”

“Ah, The Spirit of the Cedar Forest from Gilgamesh, I think I’m starting to see… But are you sure?”

“Well, there has been a certain amount of degeneration in the iconography, which is only natural, given the time span’s involved, but we can, I think, clearly see the resmemblance…”

“We can, particularly in the positioning of the arms…”

“Both ‘demons’ are described by the authorities as having a skull-like ‘canine’ or ‘lionine’ head.”

“I can go along with skull-like, but I would not like to be drawn into the dog or cat debate.”

“Very wise…”

“Ugly looking spud, though, isn’t he?”

“He is, although, almost incredibly, back in the day, his figure was made into amulets, worn, usually around the neck, and used to ward off other, more malevolent, forces.”

“The ancients’ attitude to what we might regard as ‘good’ and ‘evil’ was, to say the least, somewhat ambivalent.”

“It is at least possible, then, that the actions of the heroes in Gilgamesh were directly responsible for the creation of this ‘environmental bane’.”

“But if a good wind can be turned bad, surely a bad wind can be turned good?”

“That, my dearest Wendlebury, is what still remains to be seen.”

 

 

Cowpers Cross

Walking with a Smacked Pentax

High on Ilkley moor, near a Roman road, lies this lonely, ancient cross. Thought to have been erected in the 12th century, it lies next to the ancient trackway between the towns of Ilkley and Keighley – on lonely, high moorland miles from anywhere.

Damaged by vandals years ago, a reconstructed gatepost is now used for the upright. It has also been struck by lightning in centuries past, but has been repaired.

Originally thought to have been erected to stop locals visiting the Badger stone nearby for regular Spring gatherings, folklore says that markets were once held here around the time of the equinoxes.

Whatever it’s purpose, this cross has endured the centuries on the high windswept moors of Yorkshire. A testament to the skill and beliefs of the original builder.

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