Daily Archives: September 1, 2018

God-Man…

geometries 137*

…“But the Angles were a British tribe, right? And the Saxons were German?”

We are back in Wen’s study after the half triumph of the first of our Glastonbury talks, which aside from a few timing problems, went as well as could have been expected in view of the weather and the somewhat intricate complications of the run up.

“No, that’s not right either; both the Saxons and the Angles were Germanic tribes.”

“Our country is now named after a Germanic tribe! I think we need to know more about the Anglo-Saxons and the original Britons who could, perhaps, be more or less synonymous with what we now like to call the Celts.”

“As you may have already surmised my sense of history is somewhat sketchy at the best of times but in relation to the Anglo-Saxons and what went before it is practically non-existent.”

“That’s hardly surprising. Much of their contribution to these lands was conveniently forgotten after 1066, for obvious reasons.”

“Well, they certainly seem to have got the proportions of their churches spot on at least for the smaller sites. There is an Irish reference to the coming of Christ in one of the Conchobar stories, something about a ball being shaken loose from his head and killing him. He was also regarded as a sort of giant if memory serves. I had always assumed that the story, or at least that particular aspect of it, was merely a monkish interpolation.”

Wen is checking something in the Dictionary, “Get this… ‘Ætheling from O.E . . . . Æpling, ‘son of a king, man of royal blood, nobleman, chief, prince, king, Christ, God-Man, Hero, Saint…’

“Wait a minute… wait a minute… give me that last bit again.”

“…Christ, God-Man, Hero, Saint…”

“Didn’t we call our Arthur, Aeth in, ‘The Heart of Albion’?”

“We did.”

“And didn’t we set his story in Mercia?”

“We did.”

“And didn’t Mercia grow to become the largest and most powerful Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Albion at one point in its history?”

“It did indeed.”

“Well that’s it then…The Anglo Saxon kings were claiming divine descent.”

“…Along with most other European kings at that time no doubt.”

“That’s true, but the Anglo-Saxon kings’ descent wasn’t from God it was from Christ.”

“And how did they get there?”

“They got there from their very own High One who also hung from a tree with a spear in his side… shrieking.”

“Odin!”

“They evidently regarded Christ as an avatar of Odin.”

“Blimey, you’ll not read that in any history book!”

“Just as well we’re not writing a history then isn’t it?”

The Aetheling Thing

A Thousand Miles of History XXX: The one with the hole…

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

We had intended to visit this and another site on our way to Hayle the previous afternoon, but the map that has thus far led us without fail across Britain had refused to cooperate. It had been a long and eventful day… we had driven far and were feeling the effects of visiting so many sacred and historic sites… and so we had accepted that the land was steering us in a different direction. This time, though, as we prepared to head home, we were determined to find Mên-an-Tol, one of Cornwall’s most iconic yet enigmatic sites… and this time, we were equipped with a much more detailed map.

Turning up a road we had both passed and debated the day before, we found a parking spot by the gated track that leads to the stones. It is a fair walk, but we were now so high that the mists…

View original post 1,468 more words