The Hooded Stone…

HM15 295

“It has to be the Stone on Gardom’s Edge…”

“What does?” says Wen.

“My Robin Hood Stone… I mean it didn’t look much like the stone on Gardom’s Edge but that could have been the angle.”

I study the sketch in our guide book.

“A lot of these stones look different from each and every angle you know.” …

HM15 296

…“Let’s go find the Hud Stone,” say I.

“Is the Hud Stone the same as the Robin Hood Stone?”

“Well of course it is!”

“The same stone that we are not totally sure exists at all?”

“Well it most surely does exist if it is what Mr Harris is calling the Gardom Stone.”

“All these names are apt to become a tad confusing don’t you think?”

“Not at all, it’s just one more way of marking time.”…

HM15 297

…A short walk later and we are approaching what are undoubtedly the outer precincts of a prehistoric enclosure.

Just then I catch sight of the Gardom Stone from some distance.

There is always a thrill when seeing a site or stone for the first time, but in this case the thrill is tempered somewhat by the simultaneous realisation that, even from this distance, it is obvious that the Gardom Stone is not the Hud Stone.

“It’s there,” I say, “but it is not the Hud Stone.”

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“It’s been called, ‘The Devil Stone’ before now.”

“I can see that too, but let’s face it, we’ve had more than enough truck with that particular personage these last few months.” …

HM15 299

…“Is it significant,” interrupts Wen.

“Is what significant?”

“The fact that a lot of these stones look different from every angle… I mean it starts to look like another involution.”

“It’s spatially significant for your ubiquitous theory but how so otherwise?”

“Well, take your traditional temple of the elements.”

“Which few people ever do…”

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…“Of what does it consist?” says Wen, ignoring me.

“It consists of a uniform central point and the distinct cardinals.”

“Eloquently put, O Something Feral, eloquently put,” she smiles.

“Oh I see, the distinct cardinals have been collapsed into a central point…”

“Collapsed and reversed, which is something of an involution is it not?”

“It is indeed, Little Grub, and if that is what they were doing…”

“It is genius.”

“Genius, yes, but to what end?”

Scions of Albion

8 thoughts on “The Hooded Stone…

  1. I really love these stones. I think the significance of them is the lesson in everything we see in this world. Everything we see depends on our internal compass, and the spiritual significance to us that we identify with at any given time. It isn’t necessary perhaps to remain consistent in meaning over the many centuries, and perhaps that is an error that archaeologists, etc. make trying to make something mean the same thing to the many different cultures who have perceived them over time. I am quite sure that the Romans, if they lived in that area for any length of time, had one vision of what they meant, while later cultures saw them differently. And yet at the same time, there might have been certain elements that were seen similarly such as the stones’ relationship to the skies or other points. This is a good lesson, for it points out that in a sense, none of our thinking about these things is totally invalid. And the ways we all see things from very different perspectives says something important about prehistory and history too. I never thought about things in this way before, but this door was suddenly opened when I read this article. Reblogged on Twitter.

    Liked by 1 person

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