Category Archives: Symbolism

White-Skunk seeks medicine…


“There will never be another one, like you.

There will never be another one who can, do the things you do.”

Shaman Blues


…”My musk-sac… my power,” cried Skunk as he drifted along the river on his raft of logs.

Someone hailed him from the river-bank, “Yes, your musk-sac came floating past here,” they said, “we tried to retrieve it, but it was floating down the middle of the river.”

“My thanks, nonetheless,” shouted Skunk, “I will return and show you my good will.”

Skunk continued to wail about his lost musk-sac and a little further on somebody else hailed him from the river-bank, “As a matter of fact your musk-sac floated ashore here, but we pushed the filthy thing back into the current.”

“My curse upon you,” shouted Skunk, “I will pass back along this way and you will feel my vengeance.”

So it went with Skunk on his journey.

Some there were who, sensing its power, had attempted to retrieve the musk-sac for him whilst others, thinking it repulsive when it drifted to the shore, had thrown it back into the current of the river.

Skunk promised boons in abundance to those who had tried to help and the force of his wrath to those who had not.

By now, Skunk had drifted on his raft of logs to the lower reaches of the river.

Here, he went ashore to continue his search over land. …

to be continued


Creation II…

Image result for sumerian cylinder seals - beer and planets


… “We find the information on this board to be, ever so slightly, uncomfortable.”

“It’s slave mentality.”

“And it’s metallic mind.”

 “’The blood of the slain God’ is, perhaps, most perplexing.”

“It might be more than that if the Gods were Planetary Beings.”

“How so?”

“There is an asteroid belt orbiting the earth which some claim used to be a planet.”

“Which makes my next question even more pertinent.”

“Shouldn’t that be impertinent?”

“Who, or what, slew the God?”




Kingship was the only form of government in Ancient Mesopotamia.

It was ordained by the Gods for the guidance and prosperity of people and cities, to maintain order and to protect the wealth in society.

Among the kingly duties were military leadership, priestly functions, law-giving and city building.

When kingship broke down so did law and order, with terrible consequences.


The Wisdom of Solomon…


“So many questions.”

“Chief amongst which, perhaps, is why would the Temple be built by a demon?”

“By the Prince of Demons?”

“It may just be that we are meant to ‘subjectivise’ this story?”

“In which case, the ‘temple not built with tools’ equates to the ‘temple not built by hand’.”

“And to that inner space where speaks, and can be heard, the still small voice of the spirit.”

“And the Naxian Stone?”

“Emery, a grind-stone which is found on the Greek Island of Naxos, reputed dwelling place of Ariadne, who lays the thread that leads from the labyrinth.”

“And the cistern in the mountains?”

“A somewhat elaborate allegory again referring to the precedence of spirit. Benai is the ‘son’.”

“And the hoopoe bird?”

“The hoopoe bird is traditionally regarded as both ‘king’ and ‘demon’ and also has associations with the Queen of Sheba.”

“Solomon and Asmodeus are, in the final analysis, indistinguishable.”

“Or ‘identical’!”

“Small wonder, then, that in the dead of night, the king still fears the return of his ‘demon self’.”

“Sixty armed men is excessively fearful!”


The Wisdom of Sun and Moon VI…



… Once he had procured the Naxian Stone, king Solomon kept Asmodeus under vigilant watch and restrained him from leaving the palace until he had built the Temple.

Upon its completion, Solomon said to him, “It is written: He hath as it were the majestic strength of a rhino.  By way of allegory, we say that ‘majestic strength’ refers to the ministerial angels, while ‘rhino’ refers to the demons. But what is your advantage over us?”

Said Asmodeus, “Remove the chain from me and give me your signet ring, and I will show you my advantage.”

So, Solomon removed the chain from Asmodeus and gave to him his ring.

Asmodeus immediately swallowed the ring, positioned one of his wings on the earth, and the other wing in the heavens and hurled Solomon a distance of four-hundred Persian miles from the place where he stood.

 Thus deposed and expelled from his kingdom, Solomon went about like a pauper begging for a piece of bread, while Asmodeus held sway in the temple and palace alike, impersonating the king.

There were none in the kingdom who could see through Asmodeus’ disguise.

In every place that he went, Solomon would say, “I am the preacher. I used to be a king over Israel in Jerusalem and this was the portion of all my labour.”  At which he would show people his regal staff, and profer his bowl for alms.

The Holy Men soon began to question themselves, saying, “Had this pauper been a mad man, he would not repeat incessantly only this one thing. What is this that we have here?”

 Then they sent into the neighbouring kingdoms, asking the people there whether the king had come to them recently. They replied, saying, “Whenever the king comes and goes he demands that women cohabit with him during their period of separation!”

At hearing this, the Holy Men brought back Solomon, who had been deposed, and they gave to him the anklet and chain with on them inscribed the Ineffable Name.

When Asmodeus returned to the palace, and saw Solomon holding the anklet and chain he flew off into the sky, making good his escape.

 Even so, Solomon was forever filled with constant fear, trepidation and terror at the thought of Asmodeus’ return.



The bed of Solomon!

Sixty mighty men are about it,

O’ valiant men of Israel!

(Song of Songs 3:7-8).

The Wisdom of Sun and Moon V…


After three days, Asmodeus was brought before Solomon.

In his hand, he had taken up a stave which men use to measure, and he immediately measured out four cubits on the palace floor. Throwing down the stave before Solomon, he said to the king, “This man has naught in the world save four cubits of the grave. Were you not satisfied in conquering the whole world that you had to come and conquer me?”

Solomon said to him, “I do not want anything from you. I only wish to build the Temple and stand in need of the Naxian Stone.”

Asmodeus answered the king, “The stone has not been delivered into my keep, but rather, into that of the Prince of the Sea. And he has given its secret to none, save to the hoopoe bird, seeing that she alone is faithful in keeping to her sworn oath.”

“And what does she do with it?”

“She takes the rare stone to those desolate mountains where there is no settlement of any kind, and lays it on the ledge of a mountain. This is the reason her name is translated by us in the Aramaic tongue, ‘Mountain Carpenter’, seeing that she will first cleave the mountains, and then bring there seeds from other trees, and throw them down, causing them to spring up in those places.”

Soloman sent out Benai to search for the hoopoe bird.

He found a nest that had fledglings, and covered the nest over with a plate of translucent glass.

When the mother bird returned to her nest, seeking to go inside and feed her chicks, she could not do so.

So, she went off then to the mountains, and returned with a Naxian stone, hoping to cut the glass plate.

But Benai took the stone from her and returned to the palace with the treasure.



A dog called Toby?

(Francesco Botticini)


Tobias was the only child of a blind, holy man, named Tobit, and his wife, Anna.

Tobit sent his young son Tobias on an errand to a distant land to collect monies that were owed to him.

As he started on his journey Tobias was met by the angel, Raphael, disguised as a man named, Azarias.

Tobias and the angel started on their way accompanied by Tobias’ dog…

They stopped the first night by the River Tigris and as Tobias went to wash his feet a monstrous fish came up and tried to devour him.

Tobias wrestled with the fish and managed to haul it out onto the dry land.

The angel told Tobias to cut out the heart, gall and liver of the fish and preserve them.

Tobias and the angel arrived at the house of a kinsman named Raguel who had a daughter named Sara, his only child.

Sara had been married seven times and all seven husbands had been killed by the demon of lust, Asmodeus, before any of the marriages were consummated.

The angel Raphael told Tobias that he should marry Sara.

On their wedding night Raphael instructed Tobias to place the heart of the fish over the hot coals of the fire which he did.

The smoke from the fish drove the demon away.

Raphael followed in pursuit of the fleeing demon, and upon catching him, bound him…

Tobias and Sara, along with Tobias’ dog, returned to Tobit and Anna.

Tobias anointed his father’s eyes with the gall of the fish and Tobit’s sight was restored.

Tobit and Tobias discussed what wages to give Azarias.

When Tobit and Tobais approached Azarias to tell him that they wanted to give him half of all they possessed Azarias revealed himself as the angel, Raphael, and explained that he had been sent to help because Tobit was such a holy man.

Tobit lived to one hundred and two years.

After his death, Tobias and Sara and their seven sons returned to the house of Sara’s parents.

“Tobias and the Angel” was a popular theme in art from the early Renaissance.

In paintings from this time, Tobias is generally depicted carrying a fish and accompanied by his small dog and the angel, Raphael.

This depiction gradually developed into the image of the “Guardian Angel”.


Workshop of Andrea del Verrocchio. Tobias and the Angel. 33x26cm. 1470-75. NG London.jpg

(Andrea del Verocchio’s workshop)


The story of Tobias is told in the Book of Tobit in the Old Testament.

The book of Tobit is part of the Catholic Old Testament but is considered apocryphal by Protestants and does not form part of the Jewish canon.

It is an ancient writing and Aramaic and Hebrew fragments of the tale where found in Cave IV in Qumran in 1955.

Spirit of ‘what-not’…

Trinity like Norfolk church


We can, perhaps, now understand, a little of where this diagram is coming from.

It may be that this figure is supposed to represent a tetrahedron, yet because of its overt Patriarchy it is tempting to see a hidden second point on the underside which reads Goddess, with the reverse of, The Son, sphere being, The Daughter, and the reverse of, The Father, sphere being, The Mother.

This is, probably, not quite what the Holy Fathers had in mind, though.

We may hope that The Holy Spirit is way beyond such gender wrangles.

Triangle of One


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To re-cap…

One-Three-Six is not One-Six-Three and vice-versa, One-Six-Three is not One-Nine-Nine and vice-versa,  One-Nine-Nine is not One-Three-Six and vice-versa but One-Three-Six, One-Six-Three and One-Nine-Nine are… One.


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