Category Archives: Symbolism

Hare-Skin in Moon-Face…

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Sister-Sun and Sister-Moon

walked side by side in the sky…

Both were cold.

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One day they caught a hare,

skinned it, and put it in a cooking-pot to stew…

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While the hare was stewing

The two sisters began to quarrel

over who should take precedence at the meal…

They could not agree

and took to hurling insults at each other.

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In her rage Sister-Sun picked up the hare-skin

and flung it in the face of Sister-Moon.

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Sister-Moon retaliated by picking up the cooking-pot

and flinging its boiling contents in Sister-Sun’s face.

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Sister-Sun and Sister-Moon

no longer walk side by side in the sky…

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And since that time

Sister-Sun has become boiling hot

whilst the hare-skin she threw at her sister

can still be seen

in the silvery face of the full moon.

 

 

 

Burning down the House…

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Man was always chasing Hare

but Hare was usually too swift for him…

One day, by means of a fluke, Man caught Hare,

“Now, I’ve got you,” said Man and he tied Hare to a tree,

then he set off to look for kindling…

Hare sat quiet, pondering his predicament,

and saw Jackal cresting a rise.

Hare began to call out, loudly…

“What’s up with you,” said Jackal, hearing the commotion.

“Man has tied me here and gone in search of meat,

he means to feed me it but I don’t know how to eat it.”

“Meat eh?” said Jackal, his mouth watering,

“I’ll tell you what, let me take your place, I’m always hungry for meat.”

Hare and Jackal switched places.

Just as Hare had finished tying Hare to the tree Man came back.

He crested the distant rise with a crowd of people who were shouting,

“Burn, burn, burn…”

“What is that they are shouting?” asked Jackal.

“They are boasting about how much meat they’ve brought,” said Hare.

After the fire had died, the charred remains of Jackal were discovered,

but Hare was nowhere to be seen…

 

 

 

 

‘To Be’?…

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The Moon dies and rises to life again.

Moon said to Hare, “Go to Men and tell them,

‘like as the Moon dies and again rises to life,

so will you also.'”

Hare went to Men and said, “Like as I die

but do not rise again to life, so also with you.”

When Hare returned to Moon,

Moon asked him what he had said to Men.

Hare told Moon what he had told Men.

“What have you done,” cried Moon.

Moon took a stick and hit Hare in the mouth with it,

cleaving Hare’s lip.

Hare fled, and is fleeing still…

Considering White-Skunk…

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The Opening dynamic resembles the ‘Edenic’ in so far as a prohibition is transgressed…

‘Do not eat from that tree, for you shall surely die.’

‘Do not cross the lodge, for you shall leave a stench.’

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…And there is also a spacial parallel in that Skunk moves from a state of relative equilibrium to a state of outright hierarchy, although it could, perhaps, be argued that a state of equilibrium in which prohibitions are issued is no state of equilibrium at all.

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At any rate, Skunk moves from a  safe and protected ‘inner’ state to a dangerous and unprotected ‘outer’ state of being, as a result of his actions, as do Adam and Eve as a result of theirs.

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There are, though, some important, differences.

Were we to read Skunk’s tale literally, no one could blame the Plover and Frog sisters for Skunk’s ‘fall’ and no one could regard the sensual life as intrinsically ‘sinful’.

But then, why should we read the tale literally, it is a story after all?

Since when did ‘once upon a time’ suddenly become ‘this is how it is’?

The substitution of a dogmatic belief search, for the willing suspension of disbelief, in relation to stories, is an error which can never lead to  enlightenment.

Skunk’s error, on the other hand, is one of ‘natural order’.

The feminine prerogative of choosing a husband is perverted by his desire.

In satisfying this desire he also, inadvertently, transgresses the original prohibition.

He has to physically move the Plover Sisters from Bald-Eagle’s bed to his own.

From this, all Skunk’s ‘woes’ follow…

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White-Skunk seeks medicine…

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“There will never be another one, like you.

There will never be another one who can, do the things you do.”

Shaman Blues

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…”My musk-sac… my power,” cried Skunk as he drifted along the river on his raft of logs.

Someone hailed him from the river-bank, “Yes, your musk-sac came floating past here,” they said, “we tried to retrieve it, but it was floating down the middle of the river.”

“My thanks, nonetheless,” shouted Skunk, “I will return and show you my good will.”

Skunk continued to wail about his lost musk-sac and a little further on somebody else hailed him from the river-bank, “As a matter of fact your musk-sac floated ashore here, but we pushed the filthy thing back into the current.”

“My curse upon you,” shouted Skunk, “I will pass back along this way and you will feel my vengeance.”

So it went with Skunk on his journey.

Some there were who, sensing its power, had attempted to retrieve the musk-sac for him whilst others, thinking it repulsive when it drifted to the shore, had thrown it back into the current of the river.

Skunk promised boons in abundance to those who had tried to help and the force of his wrath to those who had not.

By now, Skunk had drifted on his raft of logs to the lower reaches of the river.

Here, he went ashore to continue his search over land. …

to be continued

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Creation II…

Image result for sumerian cylinder seals - beer and planets

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… “We find the information on this board to be, ever so slightly, uncomfortable.”

“It’s slave mentality.”

“And it’s metallic mind.”

 “’The blood of the slain God’ is, perhaps, most perplexing.”

“It might be more than that if the Gods were Planetary Beings.”

“How so?”

“There is an asteroid belt orbiting the earth which some claim used to be a planet.”

“Which makes my next question even more pertinent.”

“Shouldn’t that be impertinent?”

“Who, or what, slew the God?”

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Kingship…

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Kingship was the only form of government in Ancient Mesopotamia.

It was ordained by the Gods for the guidance and prosperity of people and cities, to maintain order and to protect the wealth in society.

Among the kingly duties were military leadership, priestly functions, law-giving and city building.

When kingship broke down so did law and order, with terrible consequences.

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The Wisdom of Solomon…

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“So many questions.”

“Chief amongst which, perhaps, is why would the Temple be built by a demon?”

“By the Prince of Demons?”

“It may just be that we are meant to ‘subjectivise’ this story?”

“In which case, the ‘temple not built with tools’ equates to the ‘temple not built by hand’.”

“And to that inner space where speaks, and can be heard, the still small voice of the spirit.”

“And the Naxian Stone?”

“Emery, a grind-stone which is found on the Greek Island of Naxos, reputed dwelling place of Ariadne, who lays the thread that leads from the labyrinth.”

“And the cistern in the mountains?”

“A somewhat elaborate allegory again referring to the precedence of spirit. Benai is the ‘son’.”

“And the hoopoe bird?”

“The hoopoe bird is traditionally regarded as both ‘king’ and ‘demon’ and also has associations with the Queen of Sheba.”

“Solomon and Asmodeus are, in the final analysis, indistinguishable.”

“Or ‘identical’!”

“Small wonder, then, that in the dead of night, the king still fears the return of his ‘demon self’.”

“Sixty armed men is excessively fearful!”

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The Wisdom of Sun and Moon VI…

 

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… Once he had procured the Naxian Stone, king Solomon kept Asmodeus under vigilant watch and restrained him from leaving the palace until he had built the Temple.

Upon its completion, Solomon said to him, “It is written: He hath as it were the majestic strength of a rhino.  By way of allegory, we say that ‘majestic strength’ refers to the ministerial angels, while ‘rhino’ refers to the demons. But what is your advantage over us?”

Said Asmodeus, “Remove the chain from me and give me your signet ring, and I will show you my advantage.”

So, Solomon removed the chain from Asmodeus and gave to him his ring.

Asmodeus immediately swallowed the ring, positioned one of his wings on the earth, and the other wing in the heavens and hurled Solomon a distance of four-hundred Persian miles from the place where he stood.

 Thus deposed and expelled from his kingdom, Solomon went about like a pauper begging for a piece of bread, while Asmodeus held sway in the temple and palace alike, impersonating the king.

There were none in the kingdom who could see through Asmodeus’ disguise.

In every place that he went, Solomon would say, “I am the preacher. I used to be a king over Israel in Jerusalem and this was the portion of all my labour.”  At which he would show people his regal staff, and profer his bowl for alms.

The Holy Men soon began to question themselves, saying, “Had this pauper been a mad man, he would not repeat incessantly only this one thing. What is this that we have here?”

 Then they sent into the neighbouring kingdoms, asking the people there whether the king had come to them recently. They replied, saying, “Whenever the king comes and goes he demands that women cohabit with him during their period of separation!”

At hearing this, the Holy Men brought back Solomon, who had been deposed, and they gave to him the anklet and chain with on them inscribed the Ineffable Name.

When Asmodeus returned to the palace, and saw Solomon holding the anklet and chain he flew off into the sky, making good his escape.

 Even so, Solomon was forever filled with constant fear, trepidation and terror at the thought of Asmodeus’ return.

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Behold!

The bed of Solomon!

Sixty mighty men are about it,

O’ valiant men of Israel!

(Song of Songs 3:7-8).