Tag Archives: meaning

The House that Fish Built: Mead…

France & Vincent

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…So, Long-Horn O’Leary was taken into the presence of the one whose mouth is sweet: “Welcome,” said Maeve, “in preference to Connor Cruel-Crest, I assign to you a cup of gold with a bird chased in silver on its bottom. Take it with you as a token of award. No one else is to see it until, at the days end, you are in the mead hall of king Grim-Gaze. When the champion’s portion is exhibited among the men of Albion then shall you bring out the cup in their presence and none of them will dispute further with you.”

Then the cup with its full of luscious mead was given to O’Leary, and he downed the contents in a draught.

“Having tasted the mead of kings,” said Maeve, “I wish that you may enjoy it a hundred years at the head of all the men of Albion.”

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Dilemmas…

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For over Two-Thousand years

Fine minds have

Pondered the problem

Of philosophical dualism.

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The living soul

A quickening spirit.

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This dilemma, perhaps, can

Best be approached by

Considering three questions.

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Why,

Clean the house

Before a birth?

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Why,

Tidy the house

Before a guest?

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And what must have

occurred before one

Is able to

Do these things?

– Count Jack Black

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Egg of the Id…

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A story should be taken to heart

And incubated

Brooded upon

Mulled over

Savoured.

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The subject of a good story is always you.

Every one of you.

Not you as you are.

You as you could be.

And, perhaps, really ought to be.

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Good stories are a part of that science of the soul

which insists that your world cannot be changed

without first changing yourself.

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Even the most seemingly insignificant story

can pick up your soul and shake it like a leaf in the wind.

Where then is the world

you thought you lived in?

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Only after the incubation

The brooding and mulling

The savouring…

Should the story be left

To fly free

In the world.

– Count Jack Black

Parsley and Partiality…

rs-268

*

… “I’ve answered two of the questions,” smiles Wen.

“You mean you’ve found solutions to two of the problems, and which would they be then?”

“I know where the tower is situated.”

“Ah, I thought you had the air of one who has been grubbing about in old books about you.”

“If by ‘grubbing about’ you mean research, I feel no sense of shame about that,” says Wen.

“Petrosinella!”

“You already know about it?”

“I know of it, yes, but I wouldn’t like to steal your thunder.”

“The tower is built in a wood.”

“Would your second ‘answer’ have anything to do with how the tower was constructed, by any chance?”

“It might,” says Wen, “and we needn’t have done any ‘grubbing’ for this one, we could have worked it out.”

“Ah, Little Grub, ’tis music to my ears… Pray explicate! Pray explicate…”

“As the Old Woman is an Enchantress, in the Grimm version, and an Ogress in Basile’s, the tower was constructed around the girl and then raised by enchantment.”

“A woman wearing a tower, naturally, I know not how I missed it, but why is the owner of the herb garden… the Enchantress… the Ogress, or even, the Sorceress, an Old Woman, and without resorting to names, who is she?”

“More problems,” says Wen.

“I am afraid so.” …

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Keys to the House of Don: Crucible…

rs-254*

‘…Such a situation invites the approach of treating the various versions  as at least theoretically, the garbled remnants of an episodic whole. While such a method can never lead us to the definitive story but merely and at every turn to a series of closely parallel yet different approximations of the definitive story, some approximations will be seen to be better or nearer the definitive story than others… ‘

Crucible of the Sun

… “Well, first off I suppose I’d better decide which of our seasons to drop,” said Wen, looking somewhat bemusedly at the sky, “and after much deliberation, I’ve decided that I’m going to drop winter.”

“Why, oh pray tell us why, Little Grub?”

“Because, psychologically, winter is death and the seasons should be all about life.”

“An admirable piece of deduction!”

“We do have a problem though.”

“We do?”

“We need to know the length of the year?”

“Don’t worry about being too precise just go with a thirteen month year.”

“Why?”

“Because in one of the extant versions of the story the princess had twelve hand-maids, and take the summer as being five months long, because of the king’s five eye patches.”

“Which makes autumn and spring each four months in length.”

“Perfectly balanced, that is, Little Grub, perfectly balanced.”

“And summer is not?”

“No, the fifth month of summer is an imbalance, hence the king’s baleful eye signifying the late summer sun which will blight the crops if they are not gathered in.”

“Does that also work psychologically?”

“How do you mean Little Grub?”

“If the Ego is not transcended, for want of a better term, then the ‘fruits’ of the individual life turn rancid?”

“I think that is true. The Ego turns to Super Ego instead of turning to the Id, takes everything, especially itself, hyper-seriously and cannot tolerate anything without its own image.”

“So why did you go with nine hand maids for the princess?” said Wen.

“They linked with the children ‘lost’ beneath the sea and signified the nine months of gestation.”

“The ‘seals’, the sea being both a watery womb and the subconscious?”

“We’ll make a lunatic of you yet, Little Grub.”

“I’m not sure I want to be a lunatic,” said Wen and then went on, “so I would have a spring smith forging the year, a summer warrior defending the year, and an autumn wizard contemplating the year,” with scant regard for just how mad that made her sound.

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Keys to the House of Don…

rs-201*

…”I do have my reputation as an I.M.O.M to consider.”

“An I.M.O.M?”

“An International Man of Mystery. And there, if you only knew it, is the first key.”

“Which is?”

Don reaches ‘blind’ behind his head and extracts from the mahogany bookcase a slim, yellow covered, paperback. He opens the book and starts to read…

‘The key to understanding these tales is to ask yourself questions. If you are alone do not be afraid to address thin air. If you ask your self enough questions your soul eventually answers and before long you will no longer be talking to air you will be walking on it…’

– The Initiate

“I take it no one answered the question?”

“You can take it that no one even realised they were expected to.”

“The magic halter?”

“Cosmologically, the magic halter is the…”

“One step at a time!”

“Cows don’t wear halters. This is the clue that tells us that the cow is not really a cow and that the halter is not really a halter.”

“Plus the fact that the cow is ‘wondrous’ and the halter is ‘magic’.”

“If the wondrous cow is the Moon and the magic halter governs the whereabouts of the Moon, then the question is, ‘what governs the daily position of the Moon’ ?”

“What force governs the daily position of the Moon?”

“Easy now, the force of gravity.”

“More specifically?”

“The force of gravity in relation to the Moon and the Earth.”

“They didn’t know about gravity in those days.”

“They knew though, by observation, that the Moon followed a regular course or pattern in the sky and that ‘something’ governed that.”

“Which was?”

“The Moon’s orbit around the Earth. The halter is an orbit.”

“That sounds like its the wrong way around, could they have thought that the Earth circuits the Moon?”

“Perhaps, but in the story the wondrous cow does make a daily circuit of the land.”

“And the land, is the Earth… okay.”

“Cosmologically, then, the magic halter is the Moon’s orbit. It is the Moon’s cycle perceived from the Earth. The Moon completes the same cycle each month that the Sun completes in a year, traversing each of the Zodiacal Houses, which means that psychologically speaking the Moon is the seed of the Sun.”

“You’re going too fast again, and anyway, they couldn’t have known all that, way back then.”

“But if they didn’t know that, then, how did it get into the story?”

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