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Time Lines…

Image result for Anzu and Ninurta


“And what have we here?” says Wen in that provocative way of hers which means she is up to something.

“Anzu and Ninurta.”

“Nope, not doing it for me.”

“Anzu, Guardian of the Threshold, who stole the Tablets of Destiny from the Gods, and Ninurta, the God of agricultural and pastoral fertility,  who was sent to slay Anzu and retrieve the tablets.”

“Hmmm… This is a late interpretation of the iconography I take it?”

“What makes you say that?”

“Oh, let’s see now, ‘Anzu’ was a Thunder-Bird, was possibly the Thunder-Bird and ‘Ninurta’ is carrying Lightning-Bolts.”

“That’s very good. A straight forward depiction of the thunder-storm.”

“Well, hardly straight forward but, essentially, yes…”

“No, those figures could hardly be described as straight forward…”

“Legs going one way…”

“…Body going the other.”

“Didn’t we have that, monster ‘looking-back-over-its-shoulder’ thing as symbolic of time at one point?”

“We did, and again, this may well be our original depiction of that concept. Not a bad effort given that, in one interpretation, this monster stole the Tablets of Destiny.”

“Not a bad effort given that, in another interpretation, thunder and lightning occur simultaneously but we see lightning first.”

“I think I like that interpretation better.”

“Even though this culture might not have known that thunder and lightning are simultaneous?”

“They knew an awful lot about the stars, and the sky, and if this is a depiction of a thunder storm, then they clearly did know. Besides, its more organic.”

“Or less contrived. Is this part of Gilgamesh?”

“Strictly speaking, no…”

“And leniently speaking?”

“Well, therein lies a tale…”

“I’m all ears.”




Kingship II…


 … “We are talking ‘Divine Kingship’ here, are we not?” asks Wen.

“Possibly… Possibly, not. It is not exactly clear is it? One thing is apparent though.”

“Oh yes?”

“At this juncture in time the institution was already ancient.”

“What makes you so sure?”

“The kingly duties listed here would originally have fallen to different individuals.”

“You mean, our king has been busy usurping the functions of his ruling elite?”

“Something like that.”

“Naughty, naughty, Mr Kingship!”

“Indeed! In cases such as these we may even have to consider the introduction of terrible consequences before the break down of this venerable institution.”

“Oh, Don, you say the kindest things.”

Scribes II…



… “When in doubt,” smiles Wen, producing a battered copy of Longmans from the murky depths of her shoulder bag, and, rather too conspicuously, for my liking, clearing her throat…

Sure enough, this unwarranted live event has now started to draw the attention of some idle strays who sidle over and form a crescent around Wen as she finally gets her reading specs onto her conk and launches into the definition…

“Incantation – noun the use of spoken or sung spells as part of a magic ritual; also, a written or recited magical formula of words designed to produce a particular effect fr Latin incantus, past participle of incatare, to enchant…”

“That’s not too bad, considering,” I concede, after I have finished dragging Wen away from our audience of somewhat bemused looking spectators.

“It’s bloody brilliant,” says Wen, “and so precise!”

“A chorus, it is then.”

Creation II…

Image result for sumerian cylinder seals - beer and planets


… “We find the information on this board to be, ever so slightly, uncomfortable.”

“It’s slave mentality.”

“And it’s metallic mind.”

 “’The blood of the slain God’ is, perhaps, most perplexing.”

“It might be more than that if the Gods were Planetary Beings.”

“How so?”

“There is an asteroid belt orbiting the earth which some claim used to be a planet.”

“Which makes my next question even more pertinent.”

“Shouldn’t that be impertinent?”

“Who, or what, slew the God?”


Deluge! II…

Image result for sumerian cylinder seals


… Wen and I are still in the British Museum mulling over one of the information boards…

“We don’t normally hold with ‘establishment views’ but this one’s not bad.”

“There seems to be a conflation of ‘Sages’ with ‘Gods’.”

“That there are seven should, perhaps, be ringing some bells.”

“The planets?”

“Planetary Beings.”

“‘Lived on earth’ probably needs ‘fleshing out’ then.”

“‘Moved amongst men’.”

“Is possibly even more confusing.”

“You’re probably right, but it is clear from the cylinder seals, that there was communication of some form.”

“Science has a lot to answer for in that respect.”

“Not least the word-salad of ‘creation’.”







Kingship was the only form of government in Ancient Mesopotamia.

It was ordained by the Gods for the guidance and prosperity of people and cities, to maintain order and to protect the wealth in society.

Among the kingly duties were military leadership, priestly functions, law-giving and city building.

When kingship broke down so did law and order, with terrible consequences.




In Mesopotamian mythology a Mother Goddess, with the assistance of a God of Wisdom, created men out of clay, mixed with the blood of a slain God.

The Primeval male and female human beings were not allotted a life-span.

People originally only died as the result of natural disasters such as plague, famine or flood, or by internecine strife.

The Epic of Gilgamesh culminated with the introduction of a limited life-span for Mankind.

Man’s original purpose in being was to relieve the Gods and Goddesses of hard labour.

Gods and Goddesses associated with birth and fertility were also patrons of mining, smelting, and metal work.




With the advent of cuneiform, the Oral Tradition continued to develop alongside ‘written literature’, but the primary purpose of recording stories in writing was not necessarily to supply individual readers with a coherent or connected account of ‘historical’ events.

Ancient stories were used for a multitude of purposes, often in extracts attached to ritual, to give authenticity, or to provide an aetiology, i.e. a reason for the way things are as they are, to lend weight to ancient traditions, or customs, or to an incantation.

Many of the ancient scribes were Incantation Priests.




Various stories relating a catastrophic flood are told by classical authors.

These flood stories may derive from a single Mesopotamian original used in travellers tales for over two thousand years along the great caravan routes of Western Asia.

In the ‘Epic of Gilgamesh’ the ‘flood story’ is used to mark the time in ancient history after which it was no longer possible for a mortal to gain immortality.

The various derivations of the flood hero’s name, or epithets, attest to this transition… ‘Super-Wise’, ‘He Found Life’, ‘The Far-Distant’, ‘The Green One’.

The flood is also important in wider Mesopotamian tradition as it marks the end of the period when the ‘Seven Sages’ lived on earth and brought to mankind the arts of civilisation…


The Wisdom of Sun and Moon VI…



… Once he had procured the Naxian Stone, king Solomon kept Asmodeus under vigilant watch and restrained him from leaving the palace until he had built the Temple.

Upon its completion, Solomon said to him, “It is written: He hath as it were the majestic strength of a rhino.  By way of allegory, we say that ‘majestic strength’ refers to the ministerial angels, while ‘rhino’ refers to the demons. But what is your advantage over us?”

Said Asmodeus, “Remove the chain from me and give me your signet ring, and I will show you my advantage.”

So, Solomon removed the chain from Asmodeus and gave to him his ring.

Asmodeus immediately swallowed the ring, positioned one of his wings on the earth, and the other wing in the heavens and hurled Solomon a distance of four-hundred Persian miles from the place where he stood.

 Thus deposed and expelled from his kingdom, Solomon went about like a pauper begging for a piece of bread, while Asmodeus held sway in the temple and palace alike, impersonating the king.

There were none in the kingdom who could see through Asmodeus’ disguise.

In every place that he went, Solomon would say, “I am the preacher. I used to be a king over Israel in Jerusalem and this was the portion of all my labour.”  At which he would show people his regal staff, and profer his bowl for alms.

The Holy Men soon began to question themselves, saying, “Had this pauper been a mad man, he would not repeat incessantly only this one thing. What is this that we have here?”

 Then they sent into the neighbouring kingdoms, asking the people there whether the king had come to them recently. They replied, saying, “Whenever the king comes and goes he demands that women cohabit with him during their period of separation!”

At hearing this, the Holy Men brought back Solomon, who had been deposed, and they gave to him the anklet and chain with on them inscribed the Ineffable Name.

When Asmodeus returned to the palace, and saw Solomon holding the anklet and chain he flew off into the sky, making good his escape.

 Even so, Solomon was forever filled with constant fear, trepidation and terror at the thought of Asmodeus’ return.



The bed of Solomon!

Sixty mighty men are about it,

O’ valiant men of Israel!

(Song of Songs 3:7-8).